Tag Archives: soap

Bay Rum & Vanilla Soap

This is a hot process soap with a moderate water discount using the following recipe:

lard 40%

coconut 20%

olive 25%

rice bran 5%

shea butter 5%

castor 5%

I blended bay rum with vanilla fragrance, I didn’t try much for a design here as it’s going to darken quite a bit due to the vanilla. I did not do a fluid HP. I sort of smooshed this down into the mold and banged it on the table for a while. I superfated this with the shea butter. I really like the rustic look of hot process soap.

Here is the color transition over a month, I was expecting to get a little darker discoloration from the vanilla than this, perhaps it will get there in time.

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Day 1
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Day 15
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Day 36

Rose Clay Soleseife

I have a great love of salt bars and I have been wanting to try a brine soap. Soleseife is a German soap made from salt water and coconut oil, also known as Brine Soap or Salt Water Soap the salt makes for a smooth extremely hard bar of soap. The only difference between this and a salt bar is I am dissolving the salt into the water before I add the lye, I am using 80% coconut oil, 15% olive oil and 5% Sunflower oil with a 10% superfat. I added Breton sea salt at 25% of the water weight. I will split the batch once emulsified and fragrance is added and then add Bentonite clay to half and rose clay to the other. I expect this to have much of the same behavior as salt bars and harden quickly. I will use individual molds. because trying to cut a bar of this is just asking for disaster. This type of soap is ideal for using delicate soap molds.

This recipe can be fiddled around with a bit, just make sure it is properly recalculated with a soap calculator. Coconut oil is one of the only oils that can lather is salt water. However you want to keep the coconut oil content above 50% and superfat high, at a 10-20% range so that it is not drying. Clay usually makes for small bubbles so if you want big bubbles you would want to leave out the clay. I scented this batch with ‘bite me’ from Nature’s Garden.

If you are looking for an exfoliating bar of soap you can add the salt at trace instead of dissolve it, here is a link to a salt bar recipe.

Teakwood & Cardamom Hot Process Soap

 

 

I added the cocoa butter at the end as the superfat. I added the cocoa powder at the same time. I like the geologic look I can get from hot process soap and mica lines.

Ingredients

550 g lard

275 g coconut oil

110 g castor oil

110 g sunflower oil

55 g cocoa butter

330 g distilled water

156 g sodium hydroxide

colorant: 100% cocoa powder, gold mica

fragrance used: Teakwood & Cardamom from Nature’s Garden

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Coconut Lime Verbena Hot Process Soap with Green Tea Butter

My biggest area of error when I make soap is remembering the fragrance oil and pre-planning what it will look like. I try to have different levels planned for how it should look. I plan an “ideal” and an “it’s too thick for that/I won’t have the time” backup plan, which is scaled back in case of acceleration. My plan for forgetting the fragrance oil is just to not forget the fragrance oil.

So I added the mica into the crockpot and mixed it in three areas with some white in between and started scooping it into the mold… but then I remembered the fragrance oil! So I decided to scoop things back into the crock pot, add the fragrance and try to get it all properly mixed in without mixing all the colors together, which I mostly failed at since this was hot process. The purple and the brown mostly became one. I should have added more color to compensate for what I had done but I had put my mica’s away already and decided to just go with things as they were. So things didn’t quite turn out to plan, I am still pleased with the end result.

This was a fairly standard plant based recipe with coconut, olive, palm, shea and castor. I am using a green tea infused butter to superfat this recipe to make it a little special.

Aqua Di Gio Soap

The oil you use can effect the overall color of your finished soap. If you want a beautiful white then lard is a good choice. Another good addition was rice bran oil, it tends to make a soap look shinier.

Information

Soap Method: Cold Process

Design Method: In the Pot Swirl

Mold: Tall & Skinny

Soaping Temperature: 117 (oil) 130 (Lye)

Fragrance: Aqua Di Gio from Natures Garden

Ingredients:

440 g manteca

330 g coconut oil

110 g castor oil

110 rice bran oil

110 g shea butter

330 g H2O

15.7 g NaOH

34 g fragrance

Mica: Caribbean blue, celestial blue and black knight mica’s from Brambleberry and Natures Garden.

 

 

Honey Rebatch Soap

I recently made a plain unscented cold process soap with the idea of rebatching it. I wanted a blank slate to start with instead of scraps that are already scented and colored. I let one pound of the soap sit and cure for a month before the rebatch. I grated the soap into a crock pot, added 1/4 cup of coconut milk and and 1 teaspoon of honey. One of the advantages of rebatching is to add luxury ingredients like oils, milks, herbs and sensitive essential oils.

I put the crockpot on high and covered it. I let it cook for about 20-30 minutes before I began stirring it every 5 minutes. Turn off the heat once it is melted enough to mix easily. You can choose to stick blend it but I decided against that.

I used a chai tea fragrance for this, It will cause some discoloration which should be interesting contrast. I used some pearly white mica to ensure the tan wouldn’t be too dark.