Tag Archives: soap

Dragon’s Blood Soap

This is a basic vegetable based soap, made of olive oil, palm oil, coconut oil, rice bran oil, cocoa butter and castor oil. I added 1 teaspoon of sea salt and sugar to the oil and I replaced half of the distilled water with coconut milk.

For the colorant I separated  the batter into three parts and blended in brick red oxide and activated charcoal, I used activated charcoal and some titanium dioxide for the grey.

I was looking for a thicker trace to do a drop swirl that wont instantly blend, plus alternating hangar swirls.

The scent is Dragon’s Blood, the resin from the dracena tropical plant.

Pine Tar Soap Recipe

Pine tar is made from placing pine in a kiln and heating it until it becomes charcoal and pine tar, which drips down from the wood and is caught in a container.

Pine tar has been used for centuries for sealing wood, protecting rope from sea water, for bug bites and skin problems such as eczema and psoriasis. Despite advances in modern medicine pine tar soap is still around and people with skin conditions still use it. As to if they are being old-timey or it’s still relevant in comparison I cannot say. It does however make a uniquely wonderful soap.

A caution however, when wood burns it releases creosote which is a carcinogen, most pine tar contains some creosote. But you also have to consider other interactions you may have with creosote for perspective, when you eat BBQ for instance, or use liquid smoke on your food, you are ingesting creosote. There is creosote free pine tar for those who wish to eliminate creosote though it can occasionally be hard to find closed kiln pine tar.

I has a very strong scent you will not be able to mask with a fragrance oil. It smells a bit like pine, rubber and smoke. Some fragrances that can work well with it are peppermint, patchouli, rosemary, cedar wood, tea tree and fir needle. You can also leave it unscented, eventually the pine tar scent will mellow. I choose to scent mine with Siberian Fir needle essential oil, it smells like pine trees and camp fire with a hint of kerosene.

There are several methods to adding the pine tar, it is recommended you add it to your oils before you add the lye water. Then blend it to thin trace and pour immediately. You can also add it just after emulsification at the thinnest trace but you should use a whisk once it has been added because it will thicken incredibly fast. Pour it as soon as you have it mixed well or it will solidify and you will be scooping and squishing it into your mold. If you add your pine tar at emulsification and whisk you should give yourself no more than 60 seconds from the addition of the pine tar before pouring, the faster the better.

This soap will be a bit soft in terms of unmolding. I let mine sit for a bit longer than usual before unmolding and cutting. I added extra water to this recipe to help with how fast it was going to thicken. I am planning on it taking 3-6 months for a full cure before this soap will be at it’s best.

Ingredients

317 g olive oil

272 g lard

91 g coconut oil

91 g palm oil

136 g pine tar

365 g distilled water

111 g sodium hydroxide

 

Bay Rum & Vanilla Soap

This is a hot process soap with a moderate water discount using the following recipe:

lard 40%

coconut 20%

olive 25%

rice bran 5%

shea butter 5%

castor 5%

I blended bay rum with vanilla fragrance, I didn’t try much for a design here as it’s going to darken quite a bit due to the vanilla. I did not do a fluid HP. I sort of smooshed this down into the mold and banged it on the table for a while. I superfated this with the shea butter. I really like the rustic look of hot process soap.

Here is the color transition over a month, I was expecting to get a little darker discoloration from the vanilla than this, perhaps it will get there in time.

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Day 1
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Day 15
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Day 36

Rose Clay Soleseife

I have a great love of salt bars and I have been wanting to try a brine soap. Soleseife is a German soap made from salt water and coconut oil, also known as Brine Soap or Salt Water Soap the salt makes for a smooth extremely hard bar of soap. The only difference between this and a salt bar is I am dissolving the salt into the water before I add the lye, I am using 80% coconut oil, 15% olive oil and 5% Sunflower oil with a 10% superfat. I added Breton sea salt at 25% of the water weight. I will split the batch once emulsified and fragrance is added and then add Bentonite clay to half and rose clay to the other. I expect this to have much of the same behavior as salt bars and harden quickly. I will use individual molds. because trying to cut a bar of this is just asking for disaster. This type of soap is ideal for using delicate soap molds.

This recipe can be fiddled around with a bit, just make sure it is properly recalculated with a soap calculator. Coconut oil is one of the only oils that can lather is salt water. However you want to keep the coconut oil content above 50% and superfat high, at a 10-20% range so that it is not drying. Clay usually makes for small bubbles so if you want big bubbles you would want to leave out the clay. I scented this batch with ‘bite me’ from Nature’s Garden.

If you are looking for an exfoliating bar of soap you can add the salt at trace instead of dissolve it, here is a link to a salt bar recipe.

Teakwood & Cardamom Hot Process Soap

 

 

I added the cocoa butter at the end as the superfat. I added the cocoa powder at the same time. I like the geologic look I can get from hot process soap and mica lines.

Ingredients

550 g lard

275 g coconut oil

110 g castor oil

110 g sunflower oil

55 g cocoa butter

330 g distilled water

156 g sodium hydroxide

colorant: 100% cocoa powder, gold mica

fragrance used: Teakwood & Cardamom from Nature’s Garden

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Coconut Lime Verbena Hot Process Soap with Green Tea Butter

My biggest area of error when I make soap is remembering the fragrance oil and pre-planning what it will look like. I try to have different levels planned for how it should look. I plan an “ideal” and an “it’s too thick for that/I won’t have the time” backup plan, which is scaled back in case of acceleration. My plan for forgetting the fragrance oil is just to not forget the fragrance oil.

So I added the mica into the crockpot and mixed it in three areas with some white in between and started scooping it into the mold… but then I remembered the fragrance oil! So I decided to scoop things back into the crock pot, add the fragrance and try to get it all properly mixed in without mixing all the colors together, which I mostly failed at since this was hot process. The purple and the brown mostly became one. I should have added more color to compensate for what I had done but I had put my mica’s away already and decided to just go with things as they were. So things didn’t quite turn out to plan, I am still pleased with the end result.

This was a fairly standard plant based recipe with coconut, olive, palm, shea and castor. I am using a green tea infused butter to superfat this recipe to make it a little special.