Kokum Butter Syndet Shampoo Bar

This is a small simple recipe, I’ve played around with several different formulations but I keep making this one. I like to make 2 small bars out of it. For shampoo bars I like to make small 1.5-2.5 oz sizes. They last incredibly long time. A hard oil like Kokum butter really helps with the hardness of the bar. 

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Ingredients

Melt

6 g stearic acid

5 g cetyl alcohol

10 g BTMS-50

5 g Kokum butter

Add Hot

15 g CAPB

32 g SCI Powder

22 g SLSa

1 g Panthenol-DL

Cool down (below 120 degrees)

2 g honeyquat

1 g oat extract

1 g rosemary tree essential oil

1 ml liquid Germall Plus

Instruction

This recipe is in three phases, add the things from the melt into a double boiler, once they are melted together remove from heat and add the things in the add hot category, mix carefully at first, you do not want to get a bunch of surfacant powder in the air. You should have a mask for this part, you do not want this stuff in your lungs. It will all melt in together as you stir. Once it is all combined check the temperature and let it sit for a few minutes until it is cool enough to continue, It’s a good time to add a colorant if you plan on doing that. Once the temperature drops below 120 add the final ingredients and mix until thoroughly combined. press into a mold, or use a press to mold. I use a moon cake press. 

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Jelly Roll Quilt Top

This is an incredibly easy and fast quilt to make. The fabrics are pre-selected, and pre cut you just have to be able to sew and cut roughly in a straight line. You need a 40 pack or two 20 packs. I have used two matching 20 packs. There are tons of good instructional video’s on YouTube, I watched many of them.

They have good sales on fabric around holidays, I suggest looking for jelly rolls with coupons in hand, they can be pricey otherwise. I happened to take advantage on Mothers Day Coupons for this fabric. It’s hard to see in pictures but there is a sparkle to this fabric.

My First Quilt

I started quilting about 2 years ago and I manage one or two a year. This was my first quilt. I used old jeans and scrap fabric from the thrift store to get used to sewing. I used a piece of paper and a ruler to make the square size and I cut all the pieces using the paper, don’t be afraid to cut through the pants seam and not waste that fabric. You can even sew entire pockets into this blanket for fun, though I did not do this. I added some fabric scraps that I found at a thrift store for some color variation and a thrift store sheet was used for the backing. I did not get the binding right on the underside, but I learned how to do binding right for the next time. I also used black thread and the backing was a white floral pattern so my thread stood out like a sore thumb. Aside from that it is still a functional blanket and I learned how to make basic quilts with confidence.

Rose Clay Soleseife

I have a great love of salt bars and I have been wanting to try a brine soap. Soleseife is a German soap made from salt water and coconut oil, also known as Brine Soap or Salt Water Soap the salt makes for a smooth extremely hard bar of soap. The only difference between this and a salt bar is I am dissolving the salt into the water before I add the lye, I am using 80% coconut oil, 15% olive oil and 5% Sunflower oil with a 10% superfat. I added Breton sea salt at 25% of the water weight. I will split the batch once emulsified and fragrance is added and then add Bentonite clay to half and rose clay to the other. I expect this to have much of the same behavior as salt bars and harden quickly. I will use individual molds. because trying to cut a bar of this is just asking for disaster. This type of soap is ideal for using delicate soap molds.

This recipe can be fiddled around with a bit, just make sure it is properly recalculated with a soap calculator. Coconut oil is one of the only oils that can lather is salt water. However you want to keep the coconut oil content above 50% and superfat high, at a 10-20% range so that it is not drying. Clay usually makes for small bubbles so if you want big bubbles you would want to leave out the clay. I scented this batch with ‘bite me’ from Nature’s Garden.

If you are looking for an exfoliating bar of soap you can add the salt at trace instead of dissolve it, here is a link to a salt bar recipe.

Cranberry Green Tea Lotion

This is a thick luxurious lotion with both green tea infused and cranberry infused butters. I’ve seen the infused butter trend pick up in the last few years, I’m not sure how long it will be a trend. It’s not hard to infuse your own oils or to use extracts and oils as a replacement to the infused butters.

I like my lotions on the thick side. I made this as a plain lotion, it is unscented and smells a little bit like green tea and quite a bit like unrefined shea butter.

 

Ingredients

Hot Phase

22.65 g emulsifying wax

8.5 g stearic acid

10 g green tea infused almond oil blend

5 g cranberry infused shea & jojoba blend

10 g rice bran oil

5.65 g shea butter

Cooling Phase

8.5 g honeyquat

8.5 g jojoba oil

100 g isopropyl myristate

255 g green tea brewed with distilled water (hot)

4.5 g green tea extract

1% optiphen ND

 

 

 

Castile Cold Process Soap

 

What is and what isn’t Castile soap is always up for debate it seems. A lot of soap makers maintain that Castile soap is 100% olive oil, water, and lye and to replace some of the olive oil with other vegetable oils would make it Bastille soap. Which is still primarily olive oil in content but includes other vegetable based oils.

You can walk into many stores and find Bastille soap sold as Castile soap and the argument continues among them.

Let’s look at the history of olive oil soap.

What we now call Castile soap was first believed to have been made in the same region in Syria as Aleppo Soap, in which incorporates laurel berry oil with olive oil.  “Castile” is named after a region in Spain, which it was given after the Crusades( 1095-1291) brought* it to Europe and the Europeans named it as such. However, the process of making 100% olive oil soap was spread all around the Mediterranean region.

The true origins of soap are lost to time and we are left with legends, the word soap itself is believed to be named after Mount Sapo, a fictional mountain somewhere in the vicinity of Rome. The earliest known documentation of soap making was written down by the Greek-Egyptian alchemist Zosimos of Panopolis around 300 B.C.E.  The oldest soap ever found was excavated in the ancient city of Babylon and dated back to around 2800 B.C.E.

There are several other variations on 100% olive oil soap that I have found throughout history, Savon de Marseille was an olive oil soap made in France with sea water first documented in the 1300’s. Nabulsi soap which was traditionally made by women in West Bank, Palestine before there was an industry, before the 10th century. Beldi soap also known as Savon Noir which has been made in Morocco for centuries is a gel like soap made from macerated olives, ashes and olive oil.

Regardless of what you call it and why, 100% olive oil soap is a very mild and wonderful soap, it takes about a year for it to fully cure. Depending on the type of olive oil you choose to use this soap may take hours or days to become solid enough to unmold. Once it hardens it can become crumbly so you have to keep an eye on it. Mine did become crumbly and work prevented me from cutting sooner but I was able to hide most of the crumbling when I trimmed up the edges. I recommend checking it daily so you do not end up cutting a soap that will crumble on you. I do highly recommend saving good quality olive oil’s for your kitchen and using lesser quality olive oil or pomace for your soaping needs.

This soap will need about seven months to a year for curing, some people even wait longer, you will want to select a fragrance that will really last, if you choose one at all. A large portion of fragrances will loose their scent before the cure would be finished. A steep water discount gets you the lower end of the cure time, I did mine at 33% of the oil weight or roughly a 28% lye concentration. Before this soap is fully cured it can feel sticky when used. it’s not a soap to make if you are an impatient soaper.

 

Teakwood & Cardamom Hot Process Soap

 

 

I added the cocoa butter at the end as the superfat. I added the cocoa powder at the same time. I like the geologic look I can get from hot process soap and mica lines.

Ingredients

550 g lard

275 g coconut oil

110 g castor oil

110 g sunflower oil

55 g cocoa butter

330 g distilled water

156 g sodium hydroxide

colorant: 100% cocoa powder, gold mica

fragrance used: Teakwood & Cardamom from Nature’s Garden

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Coconut Lime Verbena Hot Process Soap with Green Tea Butter

My biggest area of error when I make soap is remembering the fragrance oil and pre-planning what it will look like. I try to have different levels planned for how it should look. I plan an “ideal” and an “it’s too thick for that/I won’t have the time” backup plan, which is scaled back in case of acceleration. My plan for forgetting the fragrance oil is just to not forget the fragrance oil.

So I added the mica into the crockpot and mixed it in three areas with some white in between and started scooping it into the mold… but then I remembered the fragrance oil! So I decided to scoop things back into the crock pot, add the fragrance and try to get it all properly mixed in without mixing all the colors together, which I mostly failed at since this was hot process. The purple and the brown mostly became one. I should have added more color to compensate for what I had done but I had put my mica’s away already and decided to just go with things as they were. So things didn’t quite turn out to plan, I am still pleased with the end result.

This was a fairly standard plant based recipe with coconut, olive, palm, shea and castor. I am using a green tea infused butter to superfat this recipe to make it a little special.